Comparative Adverbs

Comparative Adverbs

 What are comparative adverbs?

Adverbs are used to modify verbs, adjectives, and other adverbs. They add more information based on time, place, frequency, and manner. Adverbs have usually three forms positive, comparative and superlative. The last two degrees are used for comparison.

Here we discuss comparative adverbs, their formation, spelling changes, and examples.

What are comparative adverbs?

Definition of Comparative Adverbs

What are comparative adverbs? Comparative adverbs are adverbs that compare the actions of two objects and how they perform.

He got his promotion sooner than Ali.

We don’t work harder, but smarter.

They came later, so they did not enjoy the party.

 

Formation of Compare Adverbs

To form comparative adverbs, we have three ways. The first one is adding the suffix ‘ER’ to the base adverbs. The second one is using more/less before the adverb. The third one is related to irregular adverbs. They have their specific forms. The word ‘than’ is used after comparative adverbs and before the object to be compared.

Adding Suffix ‘ER’

One-syllable adverbs or adverbs that don’t end in ‘LY’ need the suffix ‘ER’ for their comparative degrees.

Adverb

Comparative

Fast

Faster

High

Higher

Near

Nearer

Soon

Sooner

Long

Longer

You must run faster than Ali.

Ali jumped higher than me in the contest.

When the program started, Ali came nearer.

You should have called me sooner than him.

He cut the rope longer than the length you told him.

 

Spelling Changes

When we add the suffix ‘-ER’, some spelling changes take place.

If an adverb ends in ‘E’, we just add ‘R’.

Late ---- later

Fine ---- Finer

He called me later.

I felt finer today than yesterday.

 

If an adverb ends in a consonant + ‘Y’, we change ‘y’ into ‘I’ and add the suffix ‘ER’.

Early ---- earlier

Easy ---- easier                             

Ali did his test earlier than Diya.

Ali can tackle the problem easier than you.

 

Adding the Word More/Less

We use the word more/less before the adverbs that end in ‘LY’ to make their comparative degrees. It means we use more/less before adverbs that are made by adding ‘LY’ to adjectives.

Adverb

Comparative

Furiously

More furiously

Slowly

More slowly

Beautifully

More beautifully

Happily

More happily

Courageously

More courageously

The eagle swoops more furiously than the vulture.

I walked more slowly than you, so I reached later.

I saw Rohama’s dance, she danced more beautifully than Adela.

I arranged the program more happily as you were the participants.

He drove more courageously than you even though his brakes were not working well.

 

Irregular Adverbs

Irregular adverbs have their specific comparative degrees. You have to memorize them.

Adverb

Comparative

Badly

Worse

Well

Better

Much

More

Far

Farther/further

Little

Less

He replied to me worse than you.

He had studied better than you.

He did more for the nation than you.

We went farther than that place to prey yesterday. 

Tea is not sweet enough. I think you have put in less than enough sugar.

 

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